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Dawg Treats – Saturday

Mark Richt

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Dawg News

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Ranking 2013 SEC tight ends

1. Arthur Lynch, Georgia (SR)

Arthur Lynch’s last play as a Bulldog will be remembered as the drop against Nebraska in the bowl game, but he had a wonderful career and big senior season. He led all SEC tight ends with 30 catches for 459 yards and five TDs. After the injuries UGA suffered at receiver, Lynch became increasingly more important in the passing game, and replacing his production next season will be tough. Lynch should get a shot at the next level and should be just fine.

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2014 Heisman hopefuls

Georgia RB Todd Gurley: Had Gurley stayed healthy, he may have had a seat in New York last year. Had he not missed all of October, he might have had the stats to support such a trip. Even so, the talented tailback averaged 98.9 yards per game and had one of the most impressive touchdown-to-rush ratios in the country at 6.1 percent, a full percentage point more than Boston College’s Andre Williams, who finished fourth in the Heisman balloting. At the Gator Bowl, Gurley showed that even on a sore ankle he is one of the best backs in the country, racking up 183 total yards of offense against the Blackshirts of Nebraska. With a full offseason to heal and a new quarterback under center, Gurley could be asked to do even more in 2014.

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Coaching history

I’ve made a list of all the power-conference schools and how many coaches they’ve employed since World War II. Generally, the schools with the most coaches have not been all that successful. The schools with the fewest coaches have been successful. Let’s look at the lists.

FEWEST COACHES

1. GEORGIA 6: The Bulldogs have had six coaches since hiring Wally Butts in 1939. That’s outstanding. Georgia’s long-timers were Butts (22 years), Vince Dooley (25 years) and Mark Richt (14 years). No other school has two 20-years-plus coaches.

2. PENN STATE 6: This number is even more amazing when you consider the Nittany Lions had just two coaches over 61 years. Rip Engle 1950-65 and Joe Paterno 1966-2011. But PennState also hired Bob Higgins in 1930, and he stayed on the job through 1948. What puts Penn State below Georgia is that two Nittany coaches (Joe Bedenk 1949 and Bill O’Brien 2011-12) stayed two seasons or less.

3. MICHIGAN 8: When the Wolverines fired Rich Rodriguez after three seasons (2008-10), they broke convention. Of their six previous coaches, five lasted at least 10 years — Fritz Crisler 10, Bennie Oosterbahn 11, Bump Elliott 10, Bo Schembechler 21, Gary Moeller five, Lloyd Carr 13.

4. OHIO STATE 8: Woody Hayes lasted 24 years, Earle Bruce nine, John Cooper 13 and Jim Tressel 10. That’s solid.

5. VIRGINIA TECH  8: Frank Beamer’s been on the job 27 seasons. But Bill Dooley lasted nine years and Jerry Claiborne 11 years.

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Georgia Swimming Standout Reid Patterson Passes Away

Reid Patterson, Georgia’s first national champion and Olympian in swimming, passed away earlier this week. He was 81.
“We lost a great man,” Georgia coach Jack Bauerle said. “We lost one of the greatest athletes in the history of UGA and one of our greatest people. He was a humble gentleman and he was always quite competitive. He loved his Bulldogs and he had a wonderful relationship with our program. I will miss seeing him at all our events. He and (his wife) Anna never missed an opportunity to be in Athens.”
Patterson was a native of Pineville, Ky., and swam for the Bulldogs from 1951-54. He won the individual national title in the 100-yard freestyle in 1953, setting the American record during the meet. Patterson also claimed seven SEC titles, including three in the 100-yard freestyle.
Patterson represented the United States in the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. He finished fourth in the 100-meter freestyle final after setting the Olympic record in the event during the prelims. Patterson later held the world records in the 50-meter freestyle and on the 200-meter freestyle relay and the American records in the 400-meter freestyle and on the 400-meter medley relay.
During the 1950s, Patterson was dubbed “America’s Fastest Man In The Water.”
Patterson was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1984 and Georgia’s Circle of Honor in 1997.
Patterson’s grandson, Nathan Bibliowicz, was a Georgia swimmer from 2005-08. Bibliowicz was a seven-time All-American for the Bulldogs.

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Check out coach Pruitt’s run defense

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Sports and Grits takes on FSU fans

The Noles felt they were about to go on a dynasty run….insert claim they are also sending a million players to the NFL….how can you reload if you are also losing so many players…pick a side already, you idiots use opposite arguments at the same time, it’s making my head spin and puke come out.  And rather than say “Thanks Coach” they had to throw him under the bus, slandering him, using the internet as a “source”, making gifs of Coach Pruitt’s head chopped off, because, hey, a Natty isn’t good enough, we need all the trophy’s!  And the utter hypocrisy of “Winston is clean as a whistle” followed by “Pruitt’s dirty” right after his hire to UGA…just Bama level full on moron.    It concluded with the FSU Athletic Department announcing all slander crap bs was wrong and untrue.   I guess FSU failed the “I’m a French model on the internet” class.
If UGA wins a NC – I don’t care if the whole staff leaves.   Seriously.  Maybe an improvement in a few places.  When you route for a team like UGA that is ever so close, closer than almost anyone, without a NC since 1980, you learn not to take things for granted.   I would have thought well of FSU, but in today’s “give me give me” 14 year level thinking college world, sitting back and having a nice cigar and bourbon isn’t enough, you got to cry your coach sucks and then lie about the whole thing.

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SEC basketball standings

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2014 breakout players

Hutson Mason waited very patiently to become Georgia’s starting quarterback, going so far as to take a redshirt in 2012 in order to give himself one year of separation from recently departed starter Aaron Murray.

It will be worth the wait.

Mason didn’t exactly come out hot in each of his first two starts of his career, but he led the Bulldogs to a 41-34 double-overtime victory over Georgia Tech to close the regular season and then threw for 320 yards in a 24-19 loss to Nebraska in the Gator Bowl.

The loss wasn’t his fault. He led his team into the red zone twice late in the fourth quarter, only to have drops derail what could have been game-winning drives.

He’s got a solid running game led by Todd Gurley to rely on and several receivers, including Michael Bennett and Malcolm Mitchell, returning. With an offseason to get acquainted with his teammates in the starting lineup, Mason should be a star in 2014.

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SEC and National News

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Vandy hires Stanford defensive coordinator Derek Mason

Mason, 44, has been at Stanford for the past four seasons and the Cardinal’s associate head coach and defensive coordinator for the past three, In 2013, Stanford was ninth in the country in scoring defense at 19 points per game. The Cardinal was also 10th in yards per play. In 2012, Stanford was 16th in total defense and 11th in scoring defense.

Mason will be tasked with sustaining the success that Franklin started at Vanderbilt. In Franklin’s three years in charge, Vanderbilt was 24-15. In the previous 10 seasons, the team was 33-84.

He’ll also have to keep a recruiting class together that has dwindled since Franklin’s departure. Three Vanderbilt commitments have followed Franklin to Penn State.

With Missouri’s emergence in the SEC East, the division is arguably tougher than it’s ever been. But unless things go completely awry, Mason and Vanderbilt should be formidable in the near future. The Commodores may not be competing regularly for division titles, but it’s not unreasonable to expect nine-win campaigns like Franklin’s teams accomplished the past two seasons.

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James Franklin on recruiting

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Baseball’s instant replay

Each manager will have at least one challenge each game. If even a portion of that challenge is successful, the manager retains the ability to challenge a second play later in the game. No manager may challenge more than two plays in a game.

After the seventh inning, if a manager has exhausted his challenges, the umpiring crew chief can initiate a review on his own.

Roughly 90% of all plays are reviewable, according to MLB officials, though some, like the “neighborhood” play at second base—when an infielder fails to touch the base while turning a double play—are not.

“This is historic, and as you can tell, quite complex,” said Atlanta Braves president John Schuerholz, the head of the instant replay committee. “Every time we peeled back one layer of the onion, we found more complexities. And that’s why it changed so from the last time we talked about it, to where we have finally settled, because The owners asked us all the same questions, why is this so changed?

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Dawg Treats

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Music by PanicFan

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North Carolina’s, Town Mountain, is touring around their fourth album, Leave the Bottle [Pinecastle Records 2012]. Based in Asheville, NC, Town Mountain is Robert Greer on vocals and guitar, Jesse Langlais on banjo and vocals, Phil Barker on mandolin and vocals, Bobby Britt on fiddle, and Jake Hopping on upright bass. One listen to their instantly memorable songs, and it’s plain to see why Grammy-winner Mike Bub would align with the group to produce Leave the Bottle as well as their third release Steady Operator [2011].

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Run Junior Run

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Diggin on the Mountainside

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Lawdog

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Lookin’ In The Mirror

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Don’t Go Home Tonight

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Stuff

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Easy unloading

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Instant justice

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HERE balloon

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Taka taka

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Serious pucker factor

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The Worst Gym Ever | Kiev, Ukraine

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BREAKING: Hundreds Feared Dead In Coors Light Party Train

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